New Content at GAS – Arthur C. Clarke: The day the future died

Arthur C. Clarke - Dec 16, 1917 - Mar 19, 2008By Lyle Bateman
Contributing Writer, [GAS]

The golden age of science fiction” is a term used to describe a particularly fertile period in science fiction, when old conventions of “the space western” were challenged with new ideas, new themes, and new energy.

There are many names associated with that period—Heinlein Bradbury and Asimov, among others—but no name is more synonymous with that heady time in science fiction than Arthur C. Clarke. The death of Clarke, yesterday at his Sri Lanka home at the age of 90, almost closes that chapter of science-fiction history. With only Ray Bradbury left from the shiniest nuggets of the Golden Age, more than just writers are passing into history… the very ethic that created the world we live in today is slowing growing pale.

Read the rest of this entry at http://www.geeksaresexy.net/2008/03/19/arthur-c-clarke-the-day-the-future-died/

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In To Africa … a Computer Geek in Lagos – New content at GASlagos, nigeria, seismic processing, geeks are sexy

Its been too long since I wrote something for Geeks Are Sexy. I’ve been in a fairly non-geek period of my life recently, focusing on my stand-up comedy side rather than my techie side. In that spirit, I thought I might combine the two sides a bit with some (hopefully humourous) recollections of my life as a system administrator in Lagos, Nigeria from 1993-1998.

See the rest of the post at Geeks are Sexy … http://www.geeksaresexy.net/2008/02/16/in-to-africa-a-computer-geek-in-lagos/

New content at GAS … The Spirit of Discovery

The Spirit of Discovery…

December 18, 2007 by lbateman | Edit | 0 comments Silica Soil on Mars

By Lyle Bateman
Contributing Writer, [GAS]

Mars is perhaps the most storied planet in our solar system. For centuries, writers and thinkers have been telling tales about the red planet. These tales have ranged from Mars as the God of War, through the vast civilizations of Edgar Rice Burroughs and HG Wells, to the more recent story of a dead, lifeless planet.

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New content at GAS … Earthrise …

EarthSet from Kaguya Lunar ProbeBy Lyle Bateman
Contributing Writer, [GAS]

I’ve been a space geek ever since I was an 8 year old kid, and spent a summer inside glued to the TV watching the Apollo-Soyuz linkup in in July 1975. I’m a little too young to have watched any of the moon landings … the last one was 1972, when I was 6, and at that time, our family didn’t have a TV set. But after catching the bug from Apollo-Soyuz, I spent the next few years learning everything I could about space travel and the Apollo program. Since that time, I’ve been a confirmed space geek, fascinated by any new developments. (continued at GAS)

Click here to read the rest of the article at GeeksAreSexy.net

New Content at GAS: In the Spirit of Gutenberg: Blogs and the Democracy of Ideas

I’ve added a new post over at Geeks are Sexy on blogging. Check it out … here’s an excerpt …

Johannes GutenbergBy Lyle Bateman
Contributing Writer, [GAS]

From a perspective of some six centuries later, it’s pretty easy to see the revolution inherent in the idea of movable type, and the printing press. Once a hugely expensive endeavor confined to the scriptoriums of only super-wealthy patrons, book production was suddenly a fraction of the cost.

Read the rest of the post at GAS …

Star Trek: TOS … progressive and regressive … @ Geeksaresexy.net

I’ve just added another post over at Geeks are Sexy, this one a discussion of Star Trek The Original Series, and how it is both progressive and regressive at the same time. Hope everyone enjoys the read … excerpt below …

The original version of Star Trek, the 3 season show from the late 60’s that introduced us not only to Spock, Kirk, and McCoy, but an entire universe made up of Kilngons and Romulans, Star Fleet and Warp drive, has been hailed by many TV historians as a ground-breaking series that shattered many taboos and stereotypes of 1960’s TV and America at large. And rightfully so … Star Trek was decades ahead of other programs in the area of racial integration and harmony as the first TV program to regularly include black actors (and, shock of shocks, a black woman no less) as integral parts of the cast. And even if the circumstances render the effect less powerful than it might have been, ST:TOS must also be hailed for the first ever inter-racial kiss on television, from the episode “Plato’s Stepchildren.”

From Star Trek: TOS … progressive and regressive at Geeksaresexy.net