New Content at GAS – Arthur C. Clarke: The day the future died

Arthur C. Clarke - Dec 16, 1917 - Mar 19, 2008By Lyle Bateman
Contributing Writer, [GAS]

The golden age of science fiction” is a term used to describe a particularly fertile period in science fiction, when old conventions of “the space western” were challenged with new ideas, new themes, and new energy.

There are many names associated with that period—Heinlein Bradbury and Asimov, among others—but no name is more synonymous with that heady time in science fiction than Arthur C. Clarke. The death of Clarke, yesterday at his Sri Lanka home at the age of 90, almost closes that chapter of science-fiction history. With only Ray Bradbury left from the shiniest nuggets of the Golden Age, more than just writers are passing into history… the very ethic that created the world we live in today is slowing growing pale.

Read the rest of this entry at http://www.geeksaresexy.net/2008/03/19/arthur-c-clarke-the-day-the-future-died/

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When Childhood dies …

Its always disturbing to read of the death of someone that we have long admired, but its perhaps even more jarring to find out a person has been dead for some time and never having been aware of it. I’ve had an experience like that today, involving an author who figured very prominently in my young life.

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The last time lord

For me, Tom Baker has always personified “the Doctor” from the classic British SF series, Doctor Who. His bumbling, grinning genius, complete with absurdly long scarf and a bag full of jelly-babies, has always seemed to be sublime casting from my perspective. Tom Baker nailed the character in a way no one else did, before or after. While fine actors like William Hartnell, Jon Pertwee, and Sylvester McCoy did an amazing job defining and filling out the character, and all did admirable jobs of showing the multiple personalities of someone like a time lord, in my mind Tom Baker’s performance has always stood above all the others.

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